Fatty acid composition and cholesterol content of FI Dorper crossbred sheep

Faridah, F.I, Shariffah, N.Y., Khairunnisak, M., Izwan, I., Dzulfazly, A., Sabariah, I. and A.K. Raymond.

Faridah, F.I, Shariffah, N.Y., Khairunnisak, M., Izwan, I., Dzulfazly, A., Sabariah, I. and A.K. Raymond.

Interest in the study of fatty acids, particularly the total quantity of saturated and unsaturated fatty acid in muscle, is mainly to understand their role in affecting human health. A previous study suggested that a decrease in saturated fatty acid (SFA) level and a concomitant increase in the monounsaturated (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) content of ruminant meat may confer benefits to human health. The present study was undertaken to assess the intramuscular fatty acid composition and cholesterol content of different muscles taken from Fl Dorper crossbred carcasses (n=7). The sheep were slaughtered with an average weight of 46 kg and age 18 mo. Meat samples were taken from longissimus dorsi region (LD, between the 12th and 13th rib) and distal region of semi-tendinosus muscle (ST) of front and back legs. A total of 21 samples were analysed for cholesterol and fatty acid composition using GC-MSD and GC-FID, respectively. The data were analysed using the Minitab 16.0. The mean concentration of cholesterol and fatty acids of the samples obtained from the three regions were analysed statistically by one-way ANOVA and mean comparison was done using Tukey Method at a significant level p=0.05. Results showed that cholesterol content was not significantly different between ribeye LD. compared to front and back ST. Fatty acid composition was primarily composed of oleic acid, followed by palmitic and stearic acids. Muscle tissue of the muttons contained an average 56.56% and 46.36% of SFA and unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), respectively. The ratios of UFA/SFA ranged from 0.82-1.08 in both LD and ST regions. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in the front and back ST was slightly higher (p>0.05) compared to CLA in the ribeye LD. These results are consistent to those reported in Spanish and British lambs.